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Feb 28 2024 07:00 AM - Feb 29 2024 10:30 AM (PST)
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SOLVED

Help with reverse-engineering an expired form from the linked Excel table

Copper Contributor

Hi,
I've been on a steep learning curve about Forms, to help a client user. And I'm a (relative) novice to troubleshooting Forms. Bear with me, please...
- My entry point was a "missing" form. To cut to the chase, it was a personal form shared with others via links (not transferred to an ms365 group), the user had left the organization, etc. So the form was past recovery, purged out of the system. And it caught them by surprise when it expired a few days ago, after the 30-day recovery cut-off.
- I now have only the Excel table where responses were being collected.
- It's easy enough to create a new form but there's one column that puzzles me, and I'd appreciate it if any of the expertise here can explain this:
- This is a forms "choice" item, and I'll explain with an example:
Let's say the 3 choices are:
- Fruit
- Vegetables
- Other

In the table rows, as expected, I can see entries where people have selected these options.
But I also see some entries with what look like concatenated additional strings. Like...

Vegetables;

Fruit;

Fruit;Apples;

Fruit;Apples;Jonathans;


And I just cannot figure out how these could have been entered via a form.
Is there a way of concatenating text fields with choices? Because that's what it looks like. I have experimented with branching and the "other" field, etc in vain.
Can anyone shed any light on this, please? It's doing my head in. :)

Thanks!

 

2 Replies
best response confirmed by IshRashad (Copper Contributor)
Solution

@IshRashad it just means it's a choice question that allows multiple answers to be selected.

 

Rob
Los Gallardos
Microsoft Power Automate Community Super User.
Principal Consultant, SharePoint and Power Platform WSP Global (and classic 1967 Morris Traveller driver)

Ha ha. Thanks, Rob.
Of course, I didn't check that (obvious) possibility.
Many thanks (says he, red-faced)
Cheers
Ish
1 best response

Accepted Solutions
best response confirmed by IshRashad (Copper Contributor)
Solution

@IshRashad it just means it's a choice question that allows multiple answers to be selected.

 

Rob
Los Gallardos
Microsoft Power Automate Community Super User.
Principal Consultant, SharePoint and Power Platform WSP Global (and classic 1967 Morris Traveller driver)

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