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Jun 05 2024, 07:30 AM - 11:30 AM (PDT)
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What is the best alternative to Rufus?

Copper Contributor

I've been using Rufus for a while now to create bootable USB drives for various operating systems and utility software. It's been a reliable tool, but recently I've encountered some limitations and errors that have made me consider looking for Rufus alternatives. Specifically, I need a tool that offers more versatility in terms of supported operating systems, including both Windows and Linux, and perhaps more advanced features like creating bootable drives from non-standard ISOs or for different architectures. Additionally, I'm interested in a user-friendly interface and perhaps better support for newer USB standards or faster write speeds. I'm reaching out to the community for recommendations on the best alternative to Rufus that could address these needs. 

 
6 Replies
best response confirmed by Reasoner985 (Copper Contributor)
Solution

@Reasoner985 

For creating bootable USB drives across different operating systems (Windows, Mac, and Linux), there are several alternatives to Rufus that cater to a variety of needs, including support for various OS images, user-friendly interfaces, and advanced features. Here are recommendations tailored for each platform:

 

Rufus alternative for Win and Mac:  SYSGeeker WonderISO: Known for its simplicity and user-friendly interface, WonderISO supports flashing Window, and even macOS images onto USB drives and SD cards. It’s cross-platform, available for Windows, Mac.

 

wonderiso mac burn.jpg

In my test, it can automatically split ISO files larger than 4GB and then automatically merge them together after production.

 

wonderiso-mac-split-install-wim-file.jpg

Rufus alternative for linux:  dd Command: For advanced users comfortable with the command line, the dd command is a powerful tool available by default on most Linux distributions. It offers precision and flexibility but requires caution due to its potential to overwrite any disk if used incorrectly.

 

Each of these tools offers a range of functionalities that might suit your specific needs for creating bootable USB drives, whether you're looking for something straightforward like WonderISO,  something versatile like UUBTE, or platform-specific tools like DiskMaker X for Mac and Fedora Media Writer for Linux.

@Reasoner985 

To get the best alternatives to Rufus that you could consider:

 

Ventoy: This tool is unique as it can support multiple ISO files on a single USB drive. Ventoy requires no installation and supports both UEFI and Legacy BIOS modes. It supports multiple operating systems and allows you to add new ISO files without reformatting the drive.

 

Balena Etcher: This is a popular open-source tool that is user-friendly and can be used to flash multiple operating systems to USB devices. It supports Windows, macOS, and Linux, and can create bootable drives from non-standard ISOs. It also offers faster write speeds than Rufus.

 

UNetbootin: This tool is widely used and supports Windows, Linux, and macOS. It offers a simple interface and can create bootable drives from various operating systems. UNetbootin also supports non-standard ISOs and allows you to tweak advanced settings.

 

by far ventoy (github)
boot anything you want with and without Secure Boot.

YUMI is a highly versatile tool specifically designed for Windows users seeking an efficient way to create multiboot USB drives. Unlike Rufus, which primarily focuses on creating a single bootable USB drive for OS installations or utilities, YUMI excels by enabling users to store multiple operating systems, antivirus utilities, diagnostic tools, and other software on a single USB drive. This makes YUMI an invaluable tool for IT professionals, system administrators, and tech enthusiasts who require a comprehensive toolkit in a portable format.

 

One of YUMI's key advantages is its user-friendly interface, which simplifies the process of creating a multiboot USB drive. Users can easily add, remove, or update the distributions on their USB drive without the need to reformat it every time a change is made. This flexibility allows for a customizable and up-to-date selection of tools and operating systems, ready at your fingertips.

 

YUMI supports a wide array of operating systems and utilities, including various Linux distributions (Ubuntu, Fedora, etc.), Windows installation environments, antivirus rescue disks, and system maintenance tools. This broad compatibility ensures that users can prepare for a multitude of scenarios, from system recovery to new OS installations, with just one USB drive.

sounds very much like Ventoy, thanks for adding!

@Reasoner985 

Diving into the world of creating bootable USBs, are we? Rufus is pretty neat, but I totally get wanting to branch out, especially when you hit a snag or two. You're in luck because there's a bunch of cool tools out there that can tick your boxes for versatility, user-friendliness, and those extra bells and whistles. Let me throw a couple of recommendations your way:

 

WonderISO : If you're after something that's super straightforward and pretty to look at, Etcher is your go-to. It's awesome for creating bootable USB drives for both Windows and Linux distros. It's all about that three-step process: select image, select drive, and flash! Plus, it's open-source and works across Windows, macOS, and Linux

 

UNetbootin: This one's a classic and for good reason. It supports a ton of Linux distributions straight from its interface, plus you can use it with any ISO file you've got lying around. While it might not win any beauty contests, it's reliable and gets the job done.

 

UUBYTE ISO Editor: Now, if you're looking for something a bit different, UUBYTE ISO Editor is fascinating. Instead of flashing each ISO to the USB, it lets you copy multiple ISO files onto the USB drive after you've set it up. When you boot from the USB, you get to pick which ISO to boot from. It's like having a whole library of bootable software in your pocket!

 

Each of these tools brings something unique to the table, whether it's the simplicity and beauty of Etcher, the multi-ISO capabilities of UUBYTE ISO Editor, or the ISO wizardry of WonderISO. Give them a spin and see which one clicks with you. And hey, keep exploring; there's always something new popping up in the tech world!

1 best response

Accepted Solutions
best response confirmed by Reasoner985 (Copper Contributor)
Solution

@Reasoner985 

For creating bootable USB drives across different operating systems (Windows, Mac, and Linux), there are several alternatives to Rufus that cater to a variety of needs, including support for various OS images, user-friendly interfaces, and advanced features. Here are recommendations tailored for each platform:

 

Rufus alternative for Win and Mac:  SYSGeeker WonderISO: Known for its simplicity and user-friendly interface, WonderISO supports flashing Window, and even macOS images onto USB drives and SD cards. It’s cross-platform, available for Windows, Mac.

 

wonderiso mac burn.jpg

In my test, it can automatically split ISO files larger than 4GB and then automatically merge them together after production.

 

wonderiso-mac-split-install-wim-file.jpg

Rufus alternative for linux:  dd Command: For advanced users comfortable with the command line, the dd command is a powerful tool available by default on most Linux distributions. It offers precision and flexibility but requires caution due to its potential to overwrite any disk if used incorrectly.

 

Each of these tools offers a range of functionalities that might suit your specific needs for creating bootable USB drives, whether you're looking for something straightforward like WonderISO,  something versatile like UUBTE, or platform-specific tools like DiskMaker X for Mac and Fedora Media Writer for Linux.

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