Deploy Tensorflow Machine Learning models on Azure Container Apps
Published Jan 05 2024 09:10 AM 2,776 Views
Microsoft

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Introduction

 

Organisations are increasingly understanding the value that machine learning and artificial intelligence can deliver across all industries. Subsequently those organisations are also evaluating how to move machine learning projects from experimental stages to production. This surge in AI/ML interest also comes at a time when businesses are prioritising cost optimization of new and existing technology projects.

 

Frequently customers I am speaking too are asking how they can deploy reliable, robust and cost effective deployment platforms for moving machine learning models into production. Customers using Azure to deploy CPU based ML models have a few different options, batch endpoints on Azure Machine Learning, AKS for those familiar with running enterprise Kubernetes and Azure Functions for those customers looking for a serverless option, however today we will be talking about Azure Container Apps offering hybrid benefits of both AKS and Azure Functions.

 

In this blog post we will walk through how to deploy Machine Learning models in Azure Container Apps. To start with we will discuss why Azure Container Apps can be a great destination for CPU based machine learning models and then we will begin a walkthrough of how to get started. The walkthrough covers deploying a food recognition model with an API as well as a separate front end built in React to pass the image for processing. 

 

What is Azure Container Apps?

 

Azure Container Apps (ACA) is an opinionated serverless container platform. ACA removes the operational overhead of managing creating and managing Kubernetes clusters meaning engineers or application developers no longer need to worry about completing activities such as node configuration, container orchestration and deployment details. ACA also has otherwise complex to implement features such as EasyAuth, internal service discovery and custom domains available out of the box and configurable through the console!

 

Why use Azure Container Apps to deploy machine learning models?

 

Azure container apps as mentioned offers a rich feature set out of the box. One of the most compelling features that suits ML use cases with real time inference is event based scaling using a Microsoft maintained version of the Keda HTTP Autoscaler (or Azure Queue). This means that your containerised ML service will scale on demand as needed based on load. ACA is able to scale to up to 300 replicas and higher numbers can be requested. This means with larger instance sizes customers can scale to thousands of vcpu's concurrently to deal with millions of requests.

 

Another benefit of Azure Container Apps is that organisations are able to apply existing standards and processes for application releases using containers to their ML releases too using familiar tooling such as Docker and Container registries. Finally Azure Container Apps is very cost effective. Providing an accurate estimate on costs it difficult as different models have different performance or CPU/Memory requirements but for smaller models running millions of requests a month cost is in the low single digit thousands as opposed to high hundreds of thousands.

 

The best way to understand the benefits mentioned above is to deploy a model on Azure Container Apps so lets get into the walkthrough!

 

Walkthrough

 

All files and code can be found here: owainow/ml-on-aca: A workshop created to assist in deploying containerised ML workloads onto Azure C...

 

The Readme of this repository is the same as the walkthrough below.

 

Now we know the how and the why let's start taking a look at getting started deploying a Tensor flow image inference model on Azure Container Apps. 

 

The model

 

The model we use in this demo aims to classify images of food that are passed to it. The image is passed directly through a URL and the image is then serialised for processing.

The ML model used in this demo is available from freecodecamp.org. We do not cover the training or packaging of the model in this guide. The notebook for training and packaging the model can be found here: https://github.com/eRuaro/food-vision-backend/blob/main/food_vision.ipynb

To save us the trouble of storing this model locally I have stored a version in a public Azure Storage blob. It is loaded directly by the main.py file from this URL: https://publicdemoresourcesoow.blob.core.windows.net/ml-models/food-vision-model.h5 we could alternatively also pull and store the model in the container image itself. This method can be easily changed to download and load other models. 

 

The API

 

The API created in this demo uses FastAPI. FastAPI is a high performance web framework for building API's in Python 3.8. FastAPI also has a great feature that automatically generates documentation for your API, creating a /docs route on the API host. We will be able to use this to test our ML model deployment. This is all contained within the main.py file. The API will allow us to make calls to our model to perform inference. 

 

The frontend

 

The frontend is built in react. It allows us to make a call to the API by passing in an image URL. The frontend then redirects us to the output of the model running on our other container. This showcases the full flow of the call. As a result this demo does not support a private deployment. We could however make an adjustment to the code so that the API call is made to the backend and instead of redirecting we display the return in the frontend. This would then support a private deployment of the backend. 

 

Getting Started


First clone the repository into your working directory.

 

We can do this with the following command:

 

git clone https://github.com/owainow/ml-on-aca.git

 

To start the demo we require a requirements .txt file outlining the packages required for this walk through. The packages are:

- FastAPI
- Numpy
- Uvicorn
- Image
- TensorFlow

 

The requirements.txt file can be found in the aca folder and installed with:

 

pip install -r requirements.txt

 

You will also need an Azure Subscription with the ability to deploy the following services:

 

- Azure Container Registry
- Azure Container Apps

 

If you would like to read more about Azure Container Apps before starting please see the links below:

Create our Azure Resources

 

We will be creating our Azure resources using the CLI. Please ensure you are logged in and in the correct subscription.

We first will need to create an Azure Container Registry in preparation for creating our two images. To do this with the CLI we can do the following:

 

ACR_NAME=<registry-name>
RES_GROUP=ml-aca
az login

az group create --resource-group $RES_GROUP --location eastus

az acr create --resource-group $RES_GROUP --name $ACR_NAME --sku Standard --location eastus --admin-enabled true

 

The admin enabled flag is required for some scenarios when deploying an image for ACR to certain Azure Services including ACA.

We then need to create our Container Apps environment. We will be using the consumption tier for this demo. To create our container apps environment we can run the following command:

 

az containerapp env create -n MyContainerappEnvironment -g $RES_GROUP \
--location eastus

 

This will be all that is required for now until we have our built container images.

 

Create our ML Backend Container Image

 

The model we use in this demo aims to classify images of food that are passed to it. The image is passed directly through a URL and the image is then serialised for processing.

 

The ML model used in this demo is available from freecodecamp.org. We do not cover the training or packaging of the model in this guide. The notebook for training and packaging the model can be found here: https://github.com/eRuaro/food-vision-backend/blob/main/food_vision.ipynb

 

To save us the trouble of storing this model locally I have stored a version in a public Azure Storage blob. It is loaded directly by the main.py file from this URL: https://publicdemoresourcesoow.blob.core.windows.net/ml-models/food-vision-model.h5 we could alternatively also pull and store the model in the container image itself.

 

We will be using ACR tasks to build our image. ACR tasks provides cloud based container image building across platforms to simplify the image creation process. ACR tasks can use hosted or self hosted agents if required for private deployments. In this demo we will be using hosted agents. You can learn more about ACR tasks here: https://learn.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/container-registry/container-registry-tasks-overview

 

To use ACR tasks we will run the following commands in our terminal:

 

cd aca/backend-ml

az acr build --registry $ACR_NAME --image backendml:v1 --file Dockerfile .

 

While the image is building I would encourage you to review the backend files and Dockerfile to understand what is being deployed.


Create our React Frontend Container Image

 

The frontend is built in react. It allows us to make a call to the API by passing in an image URL. The frontend then redirects us to the output of the model running on our other container. This showcases the full flow of the call.

 

As a result this demo does not support a private deployment. We could however make an adjustment to the code so that the API call is made to the backend and instead of redirecting we display the return in the frontend. This would then support a private deployment of the backend.

 

To build our frontend we will use ACR tasks. We can then build and push our image again:

 

cd ../frontend-ml

az acr build --registry $ACR_NAME --image frontendml:v1 --file Dockerfile .

 

While the image is building feel free to review the react files to familiarise yourself with the content.

 

Deploy our Application

 

Now our container images are built and uploaded we can deploy our Azure Containers into our Container Apps environments.

We will first create our ML Backend. To do this we need to create a container app associated with the environment we created earlier. We will do this in the portal so we understand some of the options available with Azure Container Apps.

 

Backend ML Container App

 

1. Start by navigating to "Container Apps" and clicking "Create".

 

2. Now set your new container app name to be "ml-backend" and associate it with the environment you created earlier.

 

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3. Next disable the QuickStart image and select the ACR you created earlier with the associated backend image. You can be flexible with the memory and CPU you would like to allocate to this container. In this example I only allocate 0.5 Cores and 1GB memory.

 

 
 

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4. Next we need to enable ingress. As mentioned due to the way our frontend calls the backend API we will need to enable access from "Anywhere" however if we were to change this call we could alternatively limit the backend ingress to within our managed environment.

We also need to set our target port on our backend to port 5000.

 

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5. Finally we should see our creation validated and we can click create.

 

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6. Once creation is finished navigate to the new resource and view the URL. Copy this as we will need this for our front end creation.

 

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We can check our container is running correctly by clicking the url and viewing the message displayed. We can also then navigate to the /docs and view the available API's.

 

image.png

 

Frontend ML Container App

 

1. To create our front end we will follow similar steps to before. We will start by creating a new container app in the same environment we used earlier.

 

image.png

2. We will then select our frontend image and select the same resource limits as before however this time we also need to add an environment variable. We can do this at the bottom of the config options. The environment variable we need to add is:

 

REACT_APP_API_ENDPOINT | "<BACKEND_URL>/net/image/prediction/"

 

image.png

 

3. We will enable ingress from anywhere to make our frontend public and set the target port as 3000.

 

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4. We can then let Azure validate the resource and click create one validated. Once this is created we can click on the frontend URL and will be taken to our frontend application.

 

From this point we can pass through any image url into the field to be processed.

 

image.png

 

Once the image url is submitted you will see the processing message. After that you will be redirected to the result of the API call on the backend container.

 

image.png

 

 

I have uploaded some images into a public storage account. Feel free to try them once your application is up and running:

 

Garlic Bread 1 - https://publicdemoresourcesoow.blob.core.windows.net/food-images/garlicbread1.jpg

Garlic Bread 2 - https://publicdemoresourcesoow.blob.core.windows.net/food-images/garlicbread2.jpg

Ice Cream - https://publicdemoresourcesoow.blob.core.windows.net/food-images/IceCream.jpg

Lasagna - https://publicdemoresourcesoow.blob.core.windows.net/food-images/lasgna.jpg

 

Feel free to upload your own images to try or use images from Google. Some images on google may not allow you to process them and may cause an error.

 

Wrap Up

 

This has served to show how easy Azure Container Apps makes it to deploy containerised versions of your ML Models ready to be consumed. This example could be improved by adding APIM in front of this ML backend to benefit from rate limiting and other enterprise standard API features.

 

We could also evaluate the autoscaling of this solution and use Azure Load Testing to ensure our container apps environment is able to scale to meet our expected demand.

 

The model, backend and front end files are all available in this repository. Feel free to fork this repository and improve the application or adjust it for your own demos.

 

Follow up

 

MLOPS can often be a challenge when we think about ML deployments on cloud native platforms. ACA has some features out of the box that can be leveraged to assist from an MLOPS perspective:

 

- Revisions - Revisions allow users to deploy multiple versions of an application into your container apps environment with build in traffic splitting. This is perfect for trailing new models in development or production environments.

 

- Azure Container Registry - Because of ACA's ease of integration with Azure container registry existing ML pipelines deploying and updating new images can use ACR tasks to regularly update container images in ACR as models are improved.

 

We could also look to make the most of Azure Container Apps DAPR integration out of the box to make our service to service calls simple using DAPR sidecars.

 

With ML OPS in mind it is worth bearing in mind that ACA is not a native ML platform and requires consideration and most likely a bespoke solution to enable monitoring of the accuracy and performance of the ML Model itself.

 

 

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