Windows 11 Battery draining while shutdown

New Contributor

I'm facing extensive battery draining after shutdown, its common to have a 4% draining per hr. even if the pc is shutdown.

 

Windows Feature Experience Pack 1000.22000.176.0

7 Replies
This could somehow happen during sleep, but 4%/h is way too much. MP
this is during shutdown, during sleep 1 to 2% is normal
Same problem here...
I turned off my laptop friday afternoon with 85% of battery life. I haven't used during the weekend, today (2 days after) for my surprise it had 54%.

@Tarek89 

 

I just experienced for my Dell XPS 9570. While plugged in the battery drained to 4% in just a few hours after I told it to "shutdown", which I thought had succeeded.

 

I've been shutting down since sleep won't work. I thought I had found a foolproof method to save my battery/fan, but I guess not. I really hope these basic power issues get resolved soon.

 

power drain plugged in off screenshot.jpg

@Tarek89I am facing the same problem. New HP laptop Spectre laptop. WFH hence connected all day, every evening I shutdown and in the morning it's about 50% battery drained. Weekend it goes to 0%. I have the fast startup and hibernation options disabled. This is really annoying as will always need a charger around.

My 4-year-old Surface book 2 still keeps most of the battery charge about 1-2% drain overnight in shutdown. I used to manually drain the battery (use on battery till 5%) once a month to keep the battery healthy.

@Tarek89 I have been seeing this similar problem. The Only Solution which I have found is to dual boot - into Ubuntu. And then Shutdown after using Linux for sometime.

 

This has shown very improved results. My battery drain has come down from 25 to 5 %. 

 

It seems that even after tweaking all the setting in Windows. Windows is still using Flash Boot Settings Improve User Experience. Which is good. But if you are person who is not using your laptop daily this is shocking as you will need to charge for some time before starting your Computer/ Laptop.

 

I hope this gets proper attention to resolve the situation for all users.

@SShindeI had the same problem. I had already disabled "fast startup" and all the other BS that Microsoft made default, and I was still draining battery after shutdown. I first tried disabling the ability of things to wake up the PC when sleeping. (Although it is pretty insane to be able to wake a computer that is SHUTDOWN. Kinda goes against the whole definition of shutdown....) That DIDN'T WORK. I also tried unplugging all USB devices from all ports while it is shutdown. That also DIDN'T WORK.

Finally, I did a troubleshooter on the power. It showed a nice bar graph of my power declining while my computer was supposedly shutdown and I was fast asleep and all devices were unplugged, even the mouse. The troubleshooter showed one application ,"Lockscreen", eating 80% of all the power in the last 12 hours.

Apparently, that stupid "active background" that shows you different pictures on your lockscreen and FORCES YOU to go to BING on EDGE (no matter what your default browser is or your default search engine) if you are careless enough not to click in exactly the right spot on your screen to get the login prompt to appear, is the culprit.

Fortunately, you can turn that monstrosity off and make your lockscreen background a fixed, unchanging picture or pattern. Once I did that, my power drain problem disappeared.

It seems that the stupid "active background" must be hitting the internet or frantically redrawing the lockscreen even when you are not ON IT or even have the computer running. Does it have some sort of dedicated screen memory, that is being accessed and updated even when that screen is not active? If that is the case, then the Microsoft engineer that wrote that code is a true idiot. Also, if after a year, Microsoft can't figure this out and send out an update to fix it, then what does that say about the quality of their engineers? I am computer literate, but certainly have never written an operating system or touched the sacred internals of any binary programs. I am lucky to keep my Linux PC's working. (Many distributions of a great Operating System, BTW, to run older hardware with security fixes after MS abandons you. I recommend Kubuntu, Ubuntu, and Zoren.)

Fortunately, the MS engineer that wrote the troubleshooter had a little sense, or I would not have had a clue.