american built custom pc in EEA can't uninstall edge and is otherwise non compliant with DMA

Copper Contributor

so I have an american build pc but it does not allow me to uninstall edge and get rid of bing. I expect someone from support to let me know how to uninstall this. its software was fully updated before shipped and so its w11 version 22631.3374 I did turn on "Get the latest updates as soon as they’re available" as instructed by https://blogs.microsoft.com/eupolicy/2024/03/07/microsoft-dma-compliance-windows-linkedin/ that article however it did not find any other updates.

 

So let me know what needs to be installed or changed to wipe out edge and kick bing off the computer as well. i do not see bing in the apps list but im getting bing results in the FILE search when i'm searching for FILES and there is still bing stuff on the lock screen.

 

Thank you and no i'm not going to reinstall the os as I'm not violating the DMA by having this machine made outside of the EEA and shipped here. now that it is here it must comply with the laws here

 

I also question what happens when i use a vpn so the DMA fix must be permanent I don't want edge to come back when i connect to some other country.

 

in short please send me the EEA DMA patches to get my machine in compliance.

 

and fix you flood checker! failing to post because of tag errors should not run up the clock for flooding!!!

15 Replies

@FordGAA  

DMA has nothing to do with your idea!

In addition, the EEA is respected, your interpretation is unfounded.  March 26, 2024—KB5035942 (OS Builds 22621.3374 and 22631.3374) Preview - Microsoft Support

How is it unfounded? The law says it must be doable and yet it's still here with no uninstall option to permanently remove it not just disable it through gpos and registry edits ... and it's the same with their ai thing they have deployed it won't uninstall either still stuck to start. same with edge its still not got an uninstall option either.
thats a good point but still want them to fix their stuff to make it uninstallable as the rules state.

@FordGAA   " The law says it must be doable and yet it's still here with no uninstall option to permanently"

Does this law (which was introduced only in Europe) work on other systems, e.g. Android -> uninstall Chrome, Mac -> uninstall Safari?

 

it is supposed to infact i do think you are supposed to be able to install other app stores on iphones but i think apple is trying to do their best to make it as hard as possible or financially not viable to do so but I personally hope they hand apple some pretty big fines and possibly kick them out from selling in the EEA for pulling their shenanigans. and its not all of europe its only countries in the eea

and there hasnt been a restriction on uninstalling chrome on android granted it goes into disabled mode which deletes stored data and uninstalls any updates basically leaving you with the installer i think google was already complying with the rulings i think more to the point android phones that are walled off by carriers or 3rd party manufacturers are more affected for example bixby on samsung and samsung garbage or verizons bloatware stuff like that but on android you always were able to uninstall things even the store and they just revert back to their installer package with no updates or cached data ... stored data you can delete manually or leave if its needed in the future.

@FordGAA 

Thank you for your reply, but I think that Europe is making too many decisions that may not be workable!

I will wait for a reasonable review of these guidelines, which certainly go far beyond monopolistic practice

im waiting for some lawyer who is in the eea who purchases an already setup possibly used machine from outside of the eea and exclusively uses a vpn pointed at london or has an isp that has their wan ip located in a non eea country. that will then be a major lawsuit and probably worth a ton for some legal firm. The dma rules dont care where the computer (including android and ©Ⓡapple™) came from nor does it care if you are vpning outside of the eea. it only cares if the person is a citizen of the eea not where that citizen currently resides. me being a dual citizen living in arizona with an italian citizenship means the dma rules apply to me and MS is currently in violation of them. ©Ⓡapple™ apparently is flaunting the laws completely and will probably get smacked down a few pegs they apparently give a "grace" period before they force you back into their walled garden and get rid of all the work you did cant wait till ©Ⓡapple™ gets whats coming. But yeah if MS doesnt allow me to get rid of edge and bing and their ai thing and xbox (yes there is a tiny shred of a connector left that you cant get rid of) I am going to start calling lawyers and seeing what kind of case can be made and how much compensation we might be able to get.
as far as i can tell chapter 1 article 1 item 2 states This Regulation shall apply to core platform services provided or offered by gatekeepers to business users established in the Union or end users established or located in the Union, irrespective of the place of establishment or residence of the gatekeepers and irrespective of the law otherwise applicable to the provision of service.

and as far as i can tell that means no matter where you are geographically as long as you are a citizen of an eea country or have the device under a business that has its headquarters in an eea country you are covered under these laws. and there is no carve out for "needing to select any specific country during intitial setup" or "have an ip inside an eea country" or "set your country to get the benefits" however im pretty sure the dma will have no problems with that last one or some other popup on systems asking what country the user has citizenship in.

well if these companies want to do business in the eea countries they must comply or they must make sure their systems do not enter those markets and when they do they probably need to stop working. there isn't any provision for devices and systems made outside of the eea or grandfathered in or even for systems that never entered the eea ever because the eea citizen is residing outside of the eea. now certainly if the citizen that has never entered he eea and has purchased a foreign system that was not in the eea and that user never alerts the company that they are part of the eea then i can't see how any court would say they are in violation because the company didn't and could not have known the user was an eea citizen. however once the company was made aware the citizen was an eea citizen and the company didn't act in a reasonable time to make sure that system was in compliance with both the dma and dsa laws then im pretty sure the law would protect that citizen especially when there is plenty of notification time and reasonable time to resolve the issues supplying necessary patches to allow the user to change the systems defaults as outlined in the dma and removing / securing the users data that has been collected between initial boot and when the company was made aware of the problem to comply with the law.

@FordGAA  

I understand your point, but the security and integration of Windows with Edge and currently Copilot – it's all about to be uninstalled – > just because of confusing laws.

Obtaining compensation in this case, it may not be possible because there has been no measurable damage and other browsers can be installed. 

Funny -> on my old Windows10 PC -> I can uninstall Edge, that means Microsoft has really implemented it in Europe!

american built custom pc in EEA can't uninstall edge and is otherwise - Microsoft Community

I dont think damages are the point im pretty sure eea would love to slap them with fines for not following the laws ... and the reason you want to get rid of this junk is because if im developing a hack and i know all these machines have copilot or edge and i know of a bug that can be exploited then i will be attacking it since it has a massive reach ... i am less likely to try and find and exploit bugs with say firefox or opera since they are less ubiquitous and therefore i will have less success.

and that is good news ... i will have to update my w10 machine and see if i can uninstall it.

@FordGAA 

It's not about the Windows build number - my computers are actually in the EEA!

I've never considered uninstalling Edge.

I don't agree with your security theory, and I uninstalled the browsers you mention a long time ago for security reasons!