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Jun 05 2024, 07:30 AM - 11:30 AM (PDT)
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How to install Windows 11 on unsupported hardware without losing data?

Copper Contributor

I'm reaching out in hopes of finding a reliable method to install Windows 11 on unsupported hardware. My current setup doesn't align with the system requirements published by Microsoft, yet I'm eager to explore possible alternatives that allow the installation without compromising my system's data. The priority is to maintain the integrity of the files and programs already in place. If anyone has successfully navigated this process, could you please share a detailed guide on how to achieve this upgrade? Insight into any tools or procedures that can facilitate the installation of Windows 11 on hardware that isn't officially supported, without causing data loss, would be immensely valuable.

 

UpdateDon't continue to reply to me. My problem has been solved. I used the WinBootMate tool to bypass the hardware limitations of Windows 11. It is a good software, simple and easy to use!

7 Replies
As per Microsoft:

Installing Windows 11 on a device that does not meet Windows 11 minimum system requirements is not recommended. If you choose to install Windows 11 on ineligible hardware, you should be comfortable assuming the risk of running into compatibility issues.

Read more here: https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/installing-windows-11-on-devices-that-don-t-meet-minimum...
best response confirmed by Kabulo_Pembamoto (Copper Contributor)
Solution

Create a backup of all your important files and documents to an external storage device or cloud storage service. This step is crucial to ensure you don't lose any data during the installation process, as there is a risk of errors or system instability.  Here are the steps for installing Windows 11 on unsupported hardware:

Step 1: Find a trusted source to download a modified version of the Windows 11 ISO that is compatible with unsupported hardware. 

Step 2: Create a bootable USB drive or DVD using the modified Windows 11 ISO. Various tools are available online, Here I recommend using WinBootMate to help create a bootable media, it can bypass Windows 11's secure boot, TPM and CPU.

 

home.png

 

Step 3. Import your ISO file and connect your USB drive to PC and choose UFI or MBR partition style. And select the option "Bypass Windows 11's Secure boot, TPM and CPU".

 

win11 bypass.png

Step 4.  Restart your computer and boot from the USB drive or DVD. 
Step 5.  Follow the instructions provided by the Windows 11 installation wizard. When prompted, select the option to upgrade or install Windows 11. 

 

select-lanaguage-windows-11-install.jpg

The following are the same steps as installing Windows 10.

WinBootMate - Try it for free:  https://www.syscute.com/guide/winbootmate.html

 

 

@Kabulo_Pembamoto 

 

Alright, diving into the somewhat murky waters of getting Windows 11 onto a system that Microsoft might not nod approvingly at, huh? Got it.

First things first, ensure you've backed up all your important files, programs, and system settings. This can't be stressed enough. Things can go sideways, and having a backup will be your safety net.

let's keep it short and sweet:

  1. Backup Everything: Seriously, don't skip this.

  2. Tweak the Registry:

    • Open regedit and navigate to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\Setup.
    • Create a new key named LabConfig if it's not there.
    • Inside LabConfig, create DWORD (32-bit) Values: BypassTPMCheck, BypassRAMCheck, and BypassSecureBootCheck if needed, setting each to 1.
  3. Get Windows 11 ISO: Download it from Microsoft's official site.

  4. Install Windows 11:

    • Mount the ISO or create a bootable USB.
    • Run the setup, following on-screen instructions. Your tweaks should bypass the hardware checks.
  5. Cross Your Fingers: Hope for a smooth installation.

  6. Check for Any Needed Driver Updates post-installation.

Note: This is a workaround and might affect stability or future updates. Proceed with caution and at your own risk.

A strategy to install Windows 11 on unsupported hardware without losing data involves altering certain registry entries via the Registry Editor. While navigating the Registry Editor is not advised for novices, those with adequate experience can safely implement this tactic by adhering to the outlined instructions.

 

This approach is particularly useful for systems equipped with an older version of TPM (for instance, TPM 1.2) or those encountering compatibility issues solely with their processor. However, it's ineffective for computers lacking a TPM chip entirely or those attempting to overcome additional installation barriers.

 

For those without access to a USB drive and facing alternative challenges, another method exists, albeit with a higher risk level due to potential issues with compatibility and drivers during an upgrade. 

 

The alternative technique involves initiating the Windows 11 setup as though it were a Windows Server installation, effectively sidestepping the usual compatibility verifications that would otherwise block the installation of Windows 11. Although this could lead to issues with drivers and settings on an upgraded machine, certain precautions can mitigate these risks. This workaround was initially introduced by AveYo on GitHub

@Kabulo_Pembamoto 

Whichever way you try, keep in mind that these methods may not work for all hardware configurations, can potentially cause system instability, and could result in data loss or other issues. It is advisable to back up your important files and create a system image before attempting any installation. Here is a general guide to install Windows 11 on unsupported hardware without losing data:

 

Check Compatibility: Review the system requirements for Windows 11 and compare them to your hardware specifications to determine if there are any significant differences. Identify any specific components that do not meet the requirements.

 

Download Windows 11 ISO: Find a reliable source to download the Windows 11 ISO file. Note that downloading ISO files from unofficial sources can be risky, so exercise caution and verify the source.

 

Create a Backup: Back up all your important files and create a system image of your current Windows installation using a reliable backup software. This ensures that you can revert to your previous state if something goes wrong during the installation process.

 

Prepare Installation Media: Using the Windows 11 ISO file, create bootable installation media, such as a USB flash drive, by using a tool like Rufus or the Windows Media Creation Tool.

 

Modify Installation Files: Some users have reported success by modifying the Windows 11 installation files to bypass hardware checks. Note that this is an advanced technique and may not work for everyone. Consult online resources or communities for guidance on how to modify the installation files.

 

Installation: Boot your computer from the USB flash drive or other installation media. Follow the on-screen prompts to install Windows 11. During the installation, select the option to keep your files and programs.

 

Post-Installation Steps: Once the installation is complete, there may be further tweaks and modifications required to ensure stability and compatibility with your hardware. Consult online resources for information specific to your hardware configuration.

@Philippe_Laberge 

Thanks for the info but it doesn't seem to work. I have Win11 installed on Win11-compatible hardware and yet every time I try to reinstall Windows, it stops at the hardware check saying it can't determine if my PC can run Win11.

 

I have tried every suggested means of bypassing the Hardware Check, yet every time the Win11 installer attempts a hardware check anyway.

 

I have not been able to complete a "Windows 11 Feature Update" in nearly two years and I don't know why. The SFC found & fixed some errors but it didn't help.

Win11 doesn't detect Win11.jpgregistry.jpg

@Kapil AryaThe thing you said about the windows 11 compatibility thing is kinda wrong, for about a while I've been running windows 11 on an i7 6700, 16GB's of DDR4, with a GTX 1060 3GB, it's been running pretty fine and I'm yet to meet any compatibility issues.

1 best response

Accepted Solutions
best response confirmed by Kabulo_Pembamoto (Copper Contributor)
Solution

Create a backup of all your important files and documents to an external storage device or cloud storage service. This step is crucial to ensure you don't lose any data during the installation process, as there is a risk of errors or system instability.  Here are the steps for installing Windows 11 on unsupported hardware:

Step 1: Find a trusted source to download a modified version of the Windows 11 ISO that is compatible with unsupported hardware. 

Step 2: Create a bootable USB drive or DVD using the modified Windows 11 ISO. Various tools are available online, Here I recommend using WinBootMate to help create a bootable media, it can bypass Windows 11's secure boot, TPM and CPU.

 

home.png

 

Step 3. Import your ISO file and connect your USB drive to PC and choose UFI or MBR partition style. And select the option "Bypass Windows 11's Secure boot, TPM and CPU".

 

win11 bypass.png

Step 4.  Restart your computer and boot from the USB drive or DVD. 
Step 5.  Follow the instructions provided by the Windows 11 installation wizard. When prompted, select the option to upgrade or install Windows 11. 

 

select-lanaguage-windows-11-install.jpg

The following are the same steps as installing Windows 10.

WinBootMate - Try it for free:  https://www.syscute.com/guide/winbootmate.html

 

 

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