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Browser and GPU process are much higher compared to Brave

Marco Mollace
Occasional Contributor

Hi!

I was comparing Edge vs Brave and I noticed that Edge uses about 30-50% of my CPU in Browser task manager (both browser and gpu) while Brave uses less than 10% combined.

I think there is some problem with resource management that must be fixed.

I hope there will be futher analysis about this behavior.

 

Surface pro 3, W10 1809

57 Replies

@Marco Mollace 

 

This is also true for MS Edge Preview internal pages, new tabs, and even empty pages and web pages with no or suppressed scripts.

 

EdgeCPU.jpg

@Marco Mollace   This is a known issue with Chromium and Chromium derivatives (e.g. Chrome, now Edge Chromium, and so on).  Chromium creates new processes for each open tab, and that eats resources.  If you open identical browser instances (6-8 identical tabs) in Edge Chromium, Edge (Classic) and Firefox, for example, and check Task Manager or other resource monitors, you'll typically see that Edge Chromium is using about 1.5 times the resources used by Edge (Classic) and Firefox, sometimes more than that.  We've had a dozen threads requesting that Microsoft do what it can to reduce resource use in Edge Chromium by bundling processes or otherwise, and we hope that Microsoft is working on it.

@tomscharbach 

 

I disagree with your comment. We have 2 separate issues here. One issue as you mentioned is browsers using a separate process per tab may consume more system resources than browsers using one common process for all open tabs. In that regard both Edge Preview and Brave are similar, as both are based on Chromium and use a separate process per tab. So your comment does NOT match the topic of this thread.

 

This brings us to second issue, namely very high CPU and GPU load in current Edge Preview builds due to bug or lack of optimization. It may also be a "known issue" to Edge developers, but your comment masks it for users thus making appear less urgent to fix, when in fact the opposite is true.

 

I have to stop testing Edge Preview, and go back to using stable Chrome (despite both are based on multiprocess Chromium), because Edge now uses MUCH more system resources due to namely this bug or lack of optimization. Compare 2 screenshots below: one is Edge with one tab open and no extensions installed using 20% of CPU and GPU resources, and another is Chrome with one tab open and multiple extensions running using 1% of PC CPU and GPU resources. Its on average 10 to 20 times higher for Edge, clearly pointing on a bug, which is not surprising for alpha builds we are offered to test.

 

Important is, such bugs should be urgently fixed to encourage users continue testing the browser, rather the masked as unrelated generic "known issue" that can not be fixed at all.

 

EdgeCPU1.jpgCromeCPU1.jpg

@sambul95   I stand corrected.  Thank you for taking the time to do so.  I am not able to replicate your results because I do not have Chrome on any of my computers, by choice.

You can try Brave for testing purposes

@Marco Mollace "You can try Brave for testing purposes"

 

I could, I suppose, but why?  The important thing is not whether I can replicate the problem, but whether Microsoft can replicate/resolve it.  Consider documenting the issue and getting your logs to Edge Support so that they can open a bug.

@Marco Mollace 

Possible corroboration?  I hopped on here because I noticed background CPU usage for Edge seems unreasonably high.  I only have two tabs open and they are both for static pages.  I closed and restarted the browser and there was no change.  I checked in the browser "task manager" (accessible by right-clicking on the title bar) and "GPU process" seems to be gobbling a lot of CPU cycles.  Why is this happening when there is basically nothing going on in the browser?

[Edit] Figured I would mention the system specs, my system has an Optimus configuration of Intel HD Graphics 4000 and Quadro M5000M, but when I took this screenshot I was accessing it remotely over Remote Desktop.

[Edit 2] For comparison, I just opened Chrome for a comparison check.  I opened the exact same two tabs.  The extensions installed are the same.  In Chrome, the "GPU process" sits mostly at 0% CPU use and occasionally spikes to 3%.  Why is it so busy in Edge?

Highlighted

This bug has just hit dev build as well, draining battery like crazy. 

@gareth25 

 

Its seems getting worse with daily Canary updates.

 

EdgeCPU2.jpg

@tomscharbach
"I do not have Chrome on any of my computers, by choice."
I don't get it - why you're so interested in Edge Chromium then?

I test Edge Preview now because regular Edge has better performance in video playback than any other browser, of course if the bug is fixed. While extensions like The Great Suspender allow to sharply cut on RAM use compare to default Edge.

 

But the devs failed to include Chrome NACL component at compiling the browser, so the video performance advantages can't be fully used, since many Chrome media apps like torrent stream players use NACL and open a player in a separate window, while the browser is hidden.

@sambul95 

 

tomscharbach: "I do not have Chrome on any of my computers, by choice."
sambul95: "I don't get it - why you're so interested in Edge Chromium then?"


I am "so interested" in Edge Chromium because (1) I have used Edge (Classic) as my primary Windows browser for the last two years, and (2) within a few months, Edge Chromium is going to replace Edge (Classic) as the in-baked Windows 10 browser.  I want to help ensure that Edge Chromium has the features/functions that I value in Edge (Classic), uses resources as sparingly as Edge (Classic), and is as secure as Edge (Classic).

@gareth25 @sambul95 @Aaron44126 

 

I did some comparison testing on CPU use this morning, opening instances of Edge (Classic), Edge Chromium and Firefox Quantum, each with 6 Bing tabs open, all in static state, on each of three Windows (a Dell XPS 8920, Intel i7, 16gb RAM, AMD Radeon 580 graphics; a Dell Latitude 7280, Intel i5, 8gb RAM, Intel 620 graphics; and a Dell Inspiron 3185, AMD a9420e, 4gb RAM, Radeon R5 graphics). I run Windows without visual effects (transparencies, shadows and so on) and I run all three browsers in native state, so no extensions or add-ons are running that could complicate results. I am using the most recent Dev build (76.0.159.0).


After the browsers were opened an had a minute or two to settle down to static state, I opened Task Manager on each of the three computers and observed CPU use of the three browsers on each computer.


In each case, over a period of 15 +/- minutes of watching Task Manager, an identical pattern appeared that was both persistent on each computer and consistent between the computers: Edge Chromium used 1-1.5% of CPU resources when in the static state described, but neither Edge (Classic) nor Firefox Quantum used CPU resources in the static state described. This snapshot from the Dell XPS 8920 illustrates what I observed:

 

Classic-Chromium-Firefox CPU Use.jpg

 

A caveat: I checked several similar Task Manager screenshots (comparing Edge (Classic) and Edge Chromium, but not Firefox) that I used in a discussion related to Chromium-based process handling. At the time I was using an earlier Dev build (I don't recall which, but I think that it was the first Dev release). I saw similar results in snapshot form (that is, Edge Chromium using 1-1.2% of CPU at rest, Edge (Classic) at 0%). The screenshots from that time suggest that the CPU use pattern is not new with the most recent builds.


I don't know whether this pattern is related to the issue reported by Marco Mollace with respect to Brave or not, and I am not in a position to compare CPU use between Edge Chromium and Chrome, which would seem to me to be a more definitive and useful test.


All I can suggest is that you run similar comparison tests between Edge Chromium and Chrome, and see if the results are similar or dissimilar. If Edge Chromium is using CPU resources in static state, but Chrome is not, then Edge Chromium has an issue that is not present in Chrome, and that should be reported as a bug.

 

@sambul95 @gareth25 @Aaron44126 

 

I installed Chrome on the XPS 8920 and ran the CPU comparison again, this time comparing CPU use on Edge (Classic) Windows 10 Version 17763.503, Edge Chromium Version 76.0.159.0, Google Chrome Version 74.0.3729.157, and Firefox 66.0.5, with identical conditions to the previous test (6 Bing instances open on each browser, all Bing instances idle, stock builds of each browser without extensions or add-ons, running on Windows 10 without visual effects.  

 

The results confirmed to me that the CPU use at idle issue is confined to Edge Chromium.  Google Chrome, like Edge (Classic) and Firefox, does not use CPU resources at idle.  Edge Chromium, and Edge Chromium alone uses CPU resources (typically in the range of 1-1.5%, sometimes higher) at idle.

 

Edge-Chrome-Firefox-Classic.jpg

I've reported the bug, pointing to this discussion thread,

@tomscharbach 

 

"I want to help ensure that new Edge uses resources as sparingly as Edge (Classic)."

 

Are you for real? What in your view prompted the devs to move to Chromium engine then? Did you look at browser usage statistics lately? :)

 

Opening Edge Classic with a few heavy tabs takes out almost all available memory on an older PC with 4GB RAM, and then it crashes. Chromium in sharp contrast has auto Tabs Discarding feature, which can be further enhanced with a choice of extensions, and makes possible to run Chrome on an older and slower PC and devices with numerous tabs open without any user effort. Let me remind you, Windows 10 official spec requires just 1Ghz CPU with 1-2 GB RAM.

 

Lets hope, the devs will bring better Edge Classic video playback performance to Edge Preview as promised, while not senselessly discarding numerous features, flags, components, and options offered by Chromium thus limiting use of its wast extensions choice.

 

"In each case, over a period of 15 +/- minutes of watching Task Manager, an identical CPU usage pattern appeared"

 

I don't want to call such testing "fake news", but a typical user wouldn't wait 15 min for "identical pattern" to appear to click on the next page link, which would immediately raise Edge Preview CPU usage back to 15-30% for the next 15 min. Again, you're doing great disservice to the team by posting such "optimistic reports", since you can't convince end users whose battery keeps draining twice faster and PC/laptop fans wind-up twice louder after starting Edge Preview compare to other browsers. Lets hope they'll fix it fast.

@Marco Mollace 

 

I can confirm the same behaviour. Much, much higher CPU & RAM usage than on previous builds.

 

I wrote a longer response here.

 

This is on both an i5-8600K / 16GB / 250GB SSD desktop and an i5-6200U / 8GB / 500GB SSD laptop. This resource-hogging is new to Edge C; the previous Edge C build was fantastic.

 

My CPU fans have not quieted once with Edge C 76.0.159.0. There is absolutely a week-by-week regression for the Dev channel (and others are reporting the same on Canary builds, too, having started earlier and the bug survived into Dev).

 

Let us know what troubleshooting information you need, Microsoft. I recommend everyone willing to post here also send a Smiley report from within Edge, so Microsoft can collect diagnostic data.

@sambul95   "Are you for real? What in your view prompted the devs to move to Chromium engine then? Did you look at browser usage statistics lately? :)"

 

I've discussed this issue with others in other threads.  I don't think that Microsoft's motivations (reducing browser development/maintenance costs for an unpaid front end to paid, profitable business services) are particularly relevant to this thread.

 

"I don't want to call such testing "fake news", but a typical user wouldn't wait 15 min for "identical pattern" to appear to click on the next page link, which would immediately raise Edge Preview CPU usage back to 15-30% for the next 15 min."

 

You sound angry, but I don't think that your anger is justified. 

 

In the post you replied to and in a subsequent post, I confirmed the CPU issue on three computers (relatively high end, mid-range and low end, using different processors and graphics), confirmed that the issue is confined to Edge Chromium by installing Google Chrome and testing against that browser, and reported the issue to the Edge team with enough documentation for them to replicate the issue and get started.   In other words, I did the basic work needed to report the issues and give Microsoft enough information to understand that the problem is a base-level issue.  At this point, it is up to Microsoft to identify the underlying cause(s) and resolve the issue.

 

I designed the testing I did to eliminate variables, such as Windows 10 visual effects, browser extensions and add-ons, graphically intensive websites, and constantly updating/changing websites.  In other words, I stripped the test environment down to the basics, as best I could, and tested four browsers (Edge (Classic), Edge Chromium, Firefox and Chrome), selecting Bing instances to allow the browsers to come to rest, eliminating the effect of ads and other changing environmental variables.  If there is a CPU drain at rest, a drain that does not exist in other browsers, then the issue is a base-level issue inherent to the browser.  That was what I was trying to check out, and that is what the results showed.

 

"Again, you're doing great disservice to the team by posting such "optimistic reports", since you can't convince end users whose battery keeps draining twice faster and PC/laptop fans wind-up twice louder after starting Edge Preview compare to other browsers."

 

It seems to me that I reported objective facts, and that my reports were neither "optimistic" nor "pessimistic".  It was not my intent to convince you are anyone else about anything.  My intent was to gather the basic facts needed to report the issue to the Edge team as a base issue isolated to Edge Chromium, and that is what I did.

 

I've done what I planned to do, and all I plan to do.   If you think that the testing I did is "fake news", then test as you see fit and report the results of your testing to Microsoft, as I did.

 

@tomscharbach 

"Fake" part in your "news" seems to limit CPU load difference to negligible 1.5% at idle, where your definition of "idle" after a webpage load is shifted to 15 min wait, while real difference is 15-30% on an average PC after 2 min wait. Meanwhile, what makes you think your report is the only one submitted to devs by now? :)

 

I'm optimistic about devs fixing this bug or "feature" sooner or later, in fact more optimistic than for the prospects of adding smiles and picture/video links to this heavy JS fitted board with almost no text area format controls. :)

 

The only thing I'd suggest Edge team to do to raise the browser popularity is ensure streaming video playback like torrents, including in a separate window via NACL, since it would allow to capitalize on Edge better integration with OS in video playback, and may attract plenty of weaker hardware users dreaming of HD torrents smooth direct playback without prior full download. This is REAL known Edge advantage, I doubt anything else would change current browser usage statistics. Meanwhile, using separate process per tab is required for stability, and some tabs open several processes for faster parallel calcs.

 

@sambul95 

 

""Fake" part in your "news" seems the limit CPU load difference to negligible 1.5% at idle, where your definition of "idle" is shifted to 15 min wait, while real difference is 15-30% on an average PC after 2 min wait."

 

The CPU usage difference appeared almost immediately.  I ran the test for 15 minutes to make certain that the issue was persistent.  I ran the test on three computers to make certain that the issue was consistent.  I ran the test when the four browsers were at rest to make certain that the issue was in the browser itself.

 

"Meanwhile, what makes you think your report is the only one submitted to devs by now? :)"

 

I don't, and I've not said or suggested that mine was the only report submitted. 

 

If the issue is as crippling under load as you and others report, I would hope that there would have been many reports submitted, a healthy fraction of which would have been systematic, objective comparison testing under load.

@tomscharbach 

 

You don't have to go that far. Just open any INTERNAL Edge webpage  - just one page, not plenty irrelevant Bing tabs, and you'll see the same high CPU load, as shown on my screenshots above. What can be more objective than showing a browser crippling under no load at all and without any tabs open? :) 

@sambul95 "You don't have to go that far. Just open any INTERNAL Edge webpage  - just one page, not plenty irrelevant Bing tabs, and you'll see the same high CPU load, as shown on my screenshots above. What can be more objective than showing a browser crippling under no load at all and without any tabs open? :)"

 

I cannot replicate your results.  I opened the "Settings" page on Edge Chromium and Google Chrome  on each of my three computers.  The "Settings" tab, in each case, was the only tab open.  The browser, in each case, was set to half screen and Task Manager was open in the other screen, so that I could check CPU use.

 

These are the results I got:

 

On the Dell XPS 8920:

 

EDGE CHROMIUM
Version 76.0.159.0 (Official build) dev (64-bit)
Tab: Settings
No Extensions, Add-ons or Modifications
CPU USE: 1.8%
Dell XPS 8920
CPU: Intel i7
RAM: 16gb
GPU: AMD Radeon 580
Windows 10 1809 Build 17763.503
Visual Effects (Transparencies, Shadows etc) Disabled


GOOGLE CHROME
Version 74.0.3729.157 (Official Build) (64-bit)
Tab: Settings
No Extensions, Add-ons or Modifications
CPU USE: 0.1%
Dell XPS 8920
CPU: Intel i7
RAM: 16gb
GPU: AMD Radeon 580
Windows 10 1809 Build 17763.503
Visual Effects (Transparencies, Shadows etc) Disabled

 

On the Dell Latitude 7280:


EDGE CHROMIUM
Version 76.0.159.0 (Official build) dev (64-bit)
Tab: Settings
No Extensions, Add-ons or Modifications
CPU USE: 4.6%
Dell Latitude 7280
CPU: Intel i5
RAM: 8gb
GPU: Intel 620
Windows 10 1809 Build 17763.503
Visual Effects (Transparencies, Shadows etc) Disabled


GOOGLE CHROME
Version 74.0.3729.157 (Official Build) (64-bit)
Tab: Settings
No Extensions, Add-ons or Modifications
CPU USE: 0.0%
Dell Latitude 7280
CPU: Intel i5
RAM: 8gb
GPU: Intel 620
Windows 10 1809 Build 17763.503
Visual Effects (Transparencies, Shadows etc) Disabled

 

On the Dell Inspiron 3185:


EDGE CHROMIUM
Version 76.0.159.0 (Official build) dev (64-bit)
Tab: Settings
No Extensions, Add-ons or Modifications
CPU USE: 5.9%
Dell Inspiron 3185
CPU: AMD 9420e
RAM: 4gb
GPU: AMD R5
Windows 10 1809 Build 17763.503
Visual Effects (Transparencies, Shadows etc) Disabled


GOOGLE CHROME
Version 74.0.3729.157 (Official Build) (64-bit)
Tab: Settings
No Extensions, Add-ons or Modifications
CPU USE: 0.0%
Dell Inspiron 3185
CPU: AMD 9420e
RAM: 4gb
GPU: AMD R5
Windows 10 1809 Build 17763.503
Visual Effects (Transparencies, Shadows etc) Disabled

 

I am not doubting your results or the validity of the issue you and others in this thread are raising.  I am simply saying that I cannot replicate your results.

 

I know, from the testing I've done (see several comments throughout the thread) that Edge Chromium has a CPU use problem, because Edge Chromium consistently and persistently uses CPU resources at rest, while other tested browsers (Edge (Classic), Firefox, Chrome) do not.  I've reported that issue, pointing to this thread.

 

I also know that Edge Chromium's CPU use at rest manifests in indirect relationship to CPU power (that is, the more powerful the CPU, the lower the percentage of CPU use; the less powerful the CPU, the higher the percentage of CPU use).  That is expected behavior.

 

I know, in addition, that CPU use jumps very high under load.  I have been using the browsers at half screen, with Task Manager running in the other half, and I routinely see CPU use jump as high as 75-85% when loading an ad-intensive web page.  That seems to be unrelated to the browser used (that is, I get the same or similar results using Edge Chromium, Edge (Classic), Firefox and Chrome), although I don't have the testing platforms sufficient to cross-test to document my impression.  All I can say on that score is that all the tested browsers use a lot of CPU temporarily while loading ad-intensive pages.

 

At any rate, I have done what I can at this point.  I intend to remove Google Chrome from my computers and put the issue in Microsoft's hands.

 

I know that this is very frustrating for you and others.  Something is clearly causing the issue you describe.  I just can't replicate, identify or isolate the issue beyond the results I've reported.  I hope that Microsoft will get to the bottom of it quickly.  I also hope that Microsoft will get to the bottom of the "CPU use at rest" issue that I've identified and reported.  The two issues may well be related.

 

The screenshot below shows the test results for the XPS 8920, just for the record:

 

Settings CPU Use Edge Chromium and Chrome.jpg

@tomscharbach Your PCs are too powerful to notice the high CPU usage of Edge C.

Also, like title of this report states, I'm talking about internal browser task manager, which clearly show how buggy is current version of Canary and Dev build, compared to other Chromium browser like Chrome, Brave etc.

It's clearly an issue of Edge C. If you want definitive proof, search online leaked builds of Edge C and compare.

If you got 1% of CPU usage, we got 20%.

 

P.S: Guys, take it easy.

@Marco Mollace  "Your PCs are too powerful to notice the high CPU usage of Edge C."

 

Okay.  I'm curious now. 

 

I do my Edge Chromium testing on three computers -- one high end, one mid-range, and one low end.  The low end computer (Dell Inspiron 3185, A6 9420 CPU, 4gb RAM, AMD R5 integrated graphics) is an entry-level computer selling for $175-$200.  I guess that it is possible to go lower than that (say, a Celeron 3060) but now much lower.  Even on the Inspiron 3185 (as reported above), Edge Chromium isn't using more than 6-7% at rest. 

 

What processor are you guys using to get CPU use results in the 20-30% range, if CPU power is the driver on this issue?

"Edge Chromium isn't using more than 6-7% at rest."
CVD, there's an issue. It should stay around 0%

@Marco Mollace ""Edge Chromium isn't using more than 6-7% at rest." CVD, there's an issue. It should stay around 0%"

 

Absolutely.  That's what I've been documenting throughout this thread, as carefully as possible, using Windows Task Manager, comparing browsers.  Edge Chromium uses CPU resources at rest; other browsers (Edge (Classic), Firefox, Chrome) don't.  Something is not right with Edge Chromium, or it would not be using CPU at rest.

 

On a related topic, I did a comparison using the in-built Browser Task Manager in Chrome and Edge Chromium.  The difference in CPU use shows up there, as well, and the numbers are closer to the results you and others have been reporting.

 

This is the side-by-side results for Edge Chromium (left) and Google Chrome (right) on the Dell Inspiron 3185:

 

Settings-Browser Task Manager.jpg

 

 

Keep in mind: It appears that there is a discrepancy between the number reported between Windows Task Manager and the browser's Task Manager.  Windows Task Manager reports the CPU use where 100% would mean that all logical CPU cores are fully loaded.  (i.e. In a system with 8 logical cores, 100% would mean that all 8 are under a full load whereas a single-core load would be 12.5%.)  The browser task manager reports 100% for one core worth of full load, so an 8-core load would be 800%.  Something to keep in mind when making comparisons.

@Aaron44126 "Keep in mind: It appears that there is a discrepancy between the number reported between Windows Task Manager and the browser's Task Manager.  Windows Task Manager reports the CPU use where 100% would mean that all logical CPU cores are fully loaded.  (i.e. In a system with 8 logical cores, 100% would mean that all 8 are under a full load whereas a single-core load would be 12.5%.)  The browser task manager reports 100% for one core worth of full load, so an 8-core load would be 800%.  Something to keep in mind when making comparisons."

 

Thanks, Aaron.  I was wondering why the metrics were so different. Now I know.  

@Aaron44126 

 

Are you stating that Edge Chromium uses only ONE core of ANY CPU? Where did you get it from? Also, I don't need to look at any Task Manager - when my laptop fans are sounding like turbines all the time I know Edge is idling, now uninstalled. :)

 

My main concern is, Edge Preview devs have an approved roadmap, which directs them to concentrate on full set feature transfer, and moving from Chrome to MS services. Which means, performance optimization issues may be very last ones on their mind right now. So no such bugs might be fixed in forceable future, thus cutting off current enthusiastic but fast shrinking testers pull. There always be some hardcore folks, knowing little about tech, but asking to add this or that classic button or check box thinking Edge team "forget" it, so targeted "web noise level" will be maintained.

@tomscharbach 

"What processor are you guys using to get CPU use results in the 20-30% range, if CPU power is the driver on this issue?"

 

It was already answered in this thread. Look no further than Win 10 official specifications: 1Ghz CPU, 1-2 GB RAM. That MUST be Edge devs target as per MS Policies and common sense, since Edge is internal Windows app. Don't forget, near same code is likely used not only on PCs, but Windows Mobile devices of various gens, Tablets and very basic and cheap Atom and such student notebooks sold in huge quantities.

 

"I was wondering why the metrics were so different. Now I know. "

 

I'd ask for some references before saying that.

@sambul95 I stated nothing of the sort.  I just stated that what the "CPU %" shown in Task Manager means is different between the two... task managers.  To compare the two you have to multiply or divide by the number of logical cores in your system.  If one process within Edge process uses more than one CPU core it will register higher than 100% in Edge task manager

@Aaron44126 

 

I'm sorry to repeat my basic question: where did you get this info from? :) Can you support it by any web links or screenshots?

@sambul95

 

I too stopped using Chromium Edge too due to performance problem. I switched back to Google Chrome and was surprised that my laptop got quiet again :-(. Very sad. I hope MS will fix this performance issue very soon.

 

I reported this issue via feedback and attached screenshot with task manager showing CPU and GPU consumption in idle state when only start page is open.

@sambul95 

 

tomscharbach:  "I was wondering why the metrics were so different. Now I know. "

sambul95: "I'd ask for some references before saying that."

 

I accepted Aaron44126's explanation (different ways of dealing with cores) because it made sense.

 

I know one half of the equation:  Windows 10 Task Manager tracks usage across all logical processors (typically two per physical core) and measures % of CPU cumulatively across the logical processors:

 

W10 Task Manager CPU Cores.jpg

 

I don't use Google Chrome on Windows or Chromium on Linux, so I'm not familiar with the Chromium-based task manager.  Accordingly, I don't know anything about the other half of the equation -- how the Chromium-based browser Task Manager tracks usages across physical/logical cores/processors.  

 

You seem to have a high level of technical expertise, and you seem to be challenging Aaron44126's explanation, so let me ask you this:  To what do you attribute the differences in CPU usage measurement between Windows 10's Task Manager and Edge Chromium's Task Manager when measuring CPU usage under identical conditions?  I'm curious to know why you think that this is happening, if you don't accept Aaron44126's explanation.  Clearly the two task managers are measuring something differently.

 

It's pretty common knowledge that the CPU usage percent in Windows Task Manager is normalized across the CPU's logical cores. A quick search would have told you. :)

 

For example:

https://www.quora.com/What-is-the-meaning-of-CPU-usage-in-a-windows-task-manager

https://superuser.com/questions/994191/what-does-cpu-column-means-on-process-tab-on-task-manager

@EbonJaeger 

 

Following the same logic, can you give some alternative links for Chromium Task Manager? I'm merely asking for sources, not sure how it measures the load. :)

@sambul95  "My main concern is, Edge Preview devs have an approved roadmap, which directs them to concentrate on full set feature transfer, and moving from Chrome to MS services. Which means, performance optimization issues may be very last ones on their mind right now."

 

Your comment suggests that you have access to the Edge team's official roadmap in some form. I understand that you may have to keep the details close to your chest, but could you comment about whether or not removing the Edge Chromium's ability to run with administrator privileges is on the roadmap?

 

I don't run Chrome on my computers, in part, because I have five or six concerns about Chrome's security.  The ability to run with administrator privileges is high on that list of security deficiencies, because it isn't all that hard to bypass/escape a sandbox.

 

@tomscharbach 

"run with admin privileges"

 

You can start a new topic about Edge Chromium Roadmap, sure many folks will contribute. This topic is dedicated to a very important bug. Edge Chromium Program Manager was working for Google Chrome Security team just months ago, so you can address your concerns to the right guy if they are justified. :)

 

"We've had a dozen threads requesting that Microsoft do what it can to reduce resource use in Edge Chromium by bundling processes"

 

You might be interested to read this thread: Why are there multiple Chrome instances running even though I only have one window open?   Its improving stability, security, and responsiveness. While I agree OS developer company is better positioned to cut on browser resource usage, if its various teams interact properly. For that to happen, a top level MS exec must be keenly interested in Edge success, given current minuscule market share and revenue from it. Now it looks more like a prestige project, though they put 200 heads on it. Keep pushing on the right buttons. :) Or try on your own.

@sambul95 I ran the SunSpider JavaScript benchmark and here you can see an Edge process using more than 100% CPU.  (At one point it spiked to over 200% but I missed grabbing a screen shot for that.)

@Aaron44126 

 

It well may be that one CPU core power in OS view or Chrome Scheduler is enough per Chromium process to render most webpages. It looks like Browser Task Manager is designed to reflect that as you suggested earlier. :)

@Aaron44126   Thanks, Aaron.  I was able to replicate your results on a Dell XPS 8920 (i7, 4 physical cores, 8 logical processors).   The Edge Chromium Task Manager showed 139.6% CPU use, while at the same moment, Windows Task Manager was showing 20.5% CPU use.   I think you've confirmed that the two measure/report CPU usage on differently, and your single/multi core explanation makes sense to me.

@Marco Mollace @sambul95 @Aaron44126 @EbonJaeger 

 

I am putting together a testing/result log (using Windows Task Manager and all three computers) that I will submit to Microsoft Edge Support either later today or Wednesday, depending on when I get it done, and ask MES to open a bug on the issue. 

 

I've found in the past that opening a bug through MES focuses attention on an issue.  In the past, MES has asked me to resubmit to Feedback using the bug number as the title, and if that happens, I will come back to the thread and report that so that any of you who wish to can do the same.


While I think that the difference between Edge Chromium's Browser Task Manager and Windows Task Manager in measuring/reporting CPU usage is interesting, the important thing to remember is that we have identified a bug in Edge Chromium (CPU use at rest) that is not hardware dependent, not tab/website dependent, is both consistent and persistent, manifests at Edge Chromium's core, and does not manifest in Edge (Classic), Chrome or Firefox.


We need to get Microsoft focused on this, and keep them focused until it is resolved.

@tomscharbach 

 

Stay focused!  Yet bug fixing priority is again defined by the Program Manager and Roadmap schedule. Another way to try is contacting this forum Mods, they can push Edge Support to at least Reply to your bug report email. :)

@sambul95 "Keep focused!  Yet bug fixing priority is again defined by the Program Manager and Roadmap schedule."

 

I've had good luck with MES responsiveness when reporting other bugs.  On earlier occasions, MES e-mailed me shortly after submission, I submitted the test/results log, MES replicated, and then opened the bug.  The point of opening a bug (as I understand it) is that the process kicks the issue onto the roadmap schedule, usually with a higher priority than it might otherwise have had.  I don't have access to the Program Manager or the Roadmap schedule, so I do what I can to kick the issue up the ladder.

 

"Another way to try is contacting this forum Mods, they can push Edge Support to at least Reply to your bug report email. "

 

I would expect the moderators to visit this thread today or tomorrow (that seems to be the pattern after a weekend thread breaks out) and report that they will notify the appropriate team(s). 

@tomscharbach 

Thank you for all your testing. This is absolutely a bug. I have found a reproducible pattern, too, regarding GPU usage. 

 

With this tab open & focused + YouTube's homepage on Edge C, I click between Edge C and my desktop to change focus.

 

When Edge C is focused

Total: 4% CPU + 1% GPU

Edge C: 2% CPU + 1% GPU

Desktop Windows Manager: 2% CPU + 0% GPU

 

When Edge C is not focused:

Total: 12% CPU + 30% GPU

Edge C: 6% CPU + 15% GPU

Desktop Windows Manager: 6% GPU + 15% GPU

 

Somehow, if Edge C is running in the background (without focus, then!), it absolutely snacks on your CPU and GPU.

umUzVkT

 

Link here: https://i.imgur.com/umUzVkT.jpg

 

This system has an i5-8600K and a NVIDIA GT 710. So, even "high-end" CPUs are noticeably affected.

 

@sambul95  

 

tomscharbach:  "We've had a dozen threads requesting that Microsoft do what it can to reduce resource use in Edge Chromium by bundling processes ..."

 

sambul95:  "You might be interested to read this thread: Why are there multiple Chrome instances running even though I only have one window open? Its improving stability, security, and responsiveness."

 

I initially posted about Chromium's resource-hogging proclivities because I misunderstood the nature of Marco's initial post, which was about excessive CPU usage at rest. If I had understood his initial post, I would have gone right to testing, in order to identify, isolate and document the bug we've reported in this thread.

 

I'm well aware of the reasons that Chromium uses multiple processes instead of bundling, and if you read the numerous earlier threads in which the topic is mentioned, comments will point you back to 2008 technical documents in which the pros and cons were hotly debated in the early days of Chromium development for the Linux platform.

 

It seems to me that is a topic you should take to another thread, if you want to do so.

 

I agree with your observation (stated in your post above this latest edit): "This topic is dedicated to a very important bug." I agree with that, and with your advice to in a more recent thread to "stay focused". Let's not get sidetracked.

We are aware of an issue that is impacting CPU and could reduce battery life.  We have a high priority bug tracking this issue and are actively investigating.  Thank you for self-hosting Microsoft Edge and alerting us of the issue. We will communicate the status of the issue in our dev updates.

@Elliot Kirk @Marco Mollace @ikjadoon @sambul95 @Aaron44126 

 

In light of Elliot's comment, I will not be filing the MES bug report mentioned earlier in this thread.

@tomscharbach 

 

Thank you for doing all your troubleshooting and research here. I'm glad it got Microsoft's attention and we're keeping this browser's development accountable.

@ikjadoon 

"we're keeping this browser's development accountable"

 

Its too early to make such assertion. Lets see what will really happen and when. :)

@Elliot Kirk 

"We have a high priority bug tracking this issue and are actively investigating."

 

And that's what I got in today's email from Edge Support:

"I've been asked to have you use the Microsoft Edge Preview feedback tool for help on this issue. Looks like yours may be the first feedback on the issue. The engineering team uses customer submissions from that tool as a means to learn customer issues and track them. 

 

Can you share this bug number with us and the link to track it, just like Mozilla's Bugzilla does?